What Happens When You Smoke Cigarettes, What Happens When You Stop Smoking and Why it’s So Hard to Quit Smoking Cigarettes.

What Happens When You Keep Smoking?

What Happens When You Quit Smoking?

Stop Smoking Effect Timeline

When smokers quit — What are the benefits over time?

  • 20 minutes after quitting: Your heart rate and blood pressure drops.

(Effect of Smoking on Arterial Stiffness and Pulse Pressure Amplification, Mahmud, A, Feely, J. 2003. Hypertension:41:183.)

  • 12 hours after quitting: The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, p. 202)

  • 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting: Your circulation improves and your lung function increases.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp.193, 194,196, 285, 323)

  • 1 to 9 months after quitting: Coughing and shortness of breath decrease; cilia (tiny hair-like structures that move mucus out of the lungs) regain normal function in the lungs, increasing the ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, and reduce the risk of infection.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 285-287, 304)

  • 1 year after quitting: The excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker’s.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, p. vi)

  • 5 years after quitting: Your stroke risk is reduced to that of a non-smoker 5 to 15 years after quitting.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, p. vi)

  • 10 years after quitting: The lung cancer death rate is about half that of a continuing smoker’s. The risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, cervix, and pancreas decrease, too.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. vi, 131, 148, 152, 155, 164,166)

  • 15 years after quitting: The risk of coronary heart disease is the same as a non-smoker’s.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, p. vi) Immediate rewards of quitting Kicking the tobacco habit offers some benefits that you’ll notice right away and some that will develop over time. These rewards can improve your day-to-day life a great deal.

  • your breath smells better
  • stained teeth get whiter
  • bad smelling clothes and hair go away
  • your yellow fingers and fingernails disappear
  • food tastes better
  • your sense of smell returns to normal
  • everyday activities no longer leave you out of breath (such as climbing stairs or light housework)

Cost The prospect of better health is a major reason for quitting, but there are other reasons, too. Smoking is expensive. It isn’t hard to figure out how much you spend on smoking: multiply how much money you spend on tobacco every day by 365 (days per year). The amount may surprise you. Now multiply that by the number of years you have been using tobacco and that amount will probably shock you. Multiply the cost per year by 10 (for the next 10 years) and ask yourself what you would rather do with that much money. And this doesn’t include other possible costs, such as higher costs for health and life insurance, and likely health care costs due to tobacco-related problems. Social acceptance Smoking is less socially acceptable now than it was in the past. Almost all workplaces now have some type of smoking rules. Some employers even prefer to hire non-smokers. Studies show smoking employees cost businesses more because they are out sick more. Employees who are ill more often than others can raise an employer’s need for expensive short-term replacement workers. They can increase insurance costs both for other employees and for the employer, who often pays part of the workers’ insurance premiums. Smokers in a building also can increase the maintenance costs of keeping odors down, since residue from cigarette smoke clings to carpets, drapes, and other fabrics. Landlords may choose not to rent to smokers since maintenance costs and insurance rates may rise when smokers live in buildings. Friends may ask you not to smoke in their homes or cars. Public buildings, concerts, and even sporting events are largely smoke-free. And more and more communities are restricting smoking in all public places, including restaurants and bars. Like it or not, finding a place to smoke can be a hassle. Smokers may also find their prospects for dating or romantic involvement, including marriage, are largely limited to other smokers, who make up less than 20% of the adult population. Health of others Smoking not only harms your health but it hurts the health of those around you. Exposure to secondhand smoke (also called environmental tobacco smoke or passive smoking) includes exhaled smoke as well as smoke from burning cigarettes. Studies have shown that secondhand smoke causes thousands of deaths each year from lung cancer and heart disease in healthy non-smokers. If a mother smokes, there is a higher risk of her baby developing asthma in childhood, especially if she smoked while she was pregnant. Smoking is also linked to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and low-birth weight infants. Babies and children raised in a household where there is smoking have more ear infections, colds, bronchitis, and other lung and breathing problems than children from non-smoking families. Secondhand smoke can also cause eye irritation, headaches, nausea, and dizziness. Setting an example If you have children, you probably want to set a good example for them. When asked, nearly all smokers say they don’t want their children to smoke, but children whose parents smoke are more likely to start smoking themselves. You can become a good role model for them by quitting now.

How To Quit Smoking.

Why is it so hard to quit smoking?

Mark Twain said, "Quitting smoking is easy. I’ve done it a thousand times." Maybe you’ve tried to quit, too. Why is quitting and staying quit hard for so many people? The answer is nicotine.

Nicotine Nicotine is a drug found naturally in tobacco. It is highly addictive — as addictive as heroin or cocaine. Over time, a person becomes physically and emotionally addicted to (dependent on) nicotine. Studies have shown that smokers must deal with both the physical and psychological (mental) dependence to quit and stay quit. How nicotine gets in, where it goes, and how long it stays When you inhale smoke, nicotine is carried deep into your lungs. There it is absorbed quickly into the bloodstream and carried throughout your body. Nicotine affects many parts of the body, including your heart and blood vessels, your hormones, your metabolism, and your brain. Nicotine can be found in breast milk and even in mucus from the cervix of a female smoker. During pregnancy, nicotine freely crosses the placenta and has been found in amniotic fluid and the umbilical cord blood of newborn infants. Several different factors can affect how long it takes the body to remove nicotine and its by-products. In most cases, regular smokers will still have nicotine or its by-products, such as cotinine, in their bodies for about 3 to 4 days after stopping. How nicotine hooks smokers Nicotine produces pleasant feelings that make the smoker want to smoke more. It also acts as a kind of depressant by interfering with the flow of information between nerve cells. As the nervous system adapts to nicotine, smokers tend to increase the number of cigarettes they smoke. This, in turn, increases the amount of nicotine in the smoker’s blood. After a while, the smoker develops a tolerance to the drug. Tolerance means that it takes more nicotine to get the same effect that the smoker used to get from smaller amounts. This leads to an increase in smoking over time. The smoker reaches a certain nicotine level and then keeps smoking to maintain this level of nicotine. In fact, nicotine inhaled in cigarette smoke reaches the brain faster than drugs that enter the body intravenously (IV). Nicotine withdrawal symptoms can lead quitters back to smoking When smokers try to cut back or quit, the lack of nicotine leads to withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal is both physical and mental. Physically, the body reacts to the absence of nicotine. Mentally, the smoker is faced with giving up a habit, which calls for a major change in behavior. The physical and mental both must be addressed for the quitting process to work. Those who have smoked regularly for a few weeks or longer, and suddenly stop using tobacco or greatly reduce the amount smoked, will have withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms usually start within a few hours of the last cigarette and peak about 2 to 3 days later when most of the nicotine and its by-products are out of the body. Withdrawal symptoms can last for a few days to up to several weeks. Withdrawal symptoms can include any of the following:

  • dizziness (which may only last 1 to 2 days after quitting)
  • depression
  • feelings of frustration, impatience, and anger
  • anxiety
  • irritability
  • sleep disturbances, including having trouble falling asleep and staying asleep, and having bad dreams or even nightmares
  • trouble concentrating
  • restlessness
  • headaches
  • tiredness
  • increased appetite

These symptoms can lead the smoker to start smoking cigarettes again to boost blood levels of nicotine back to a level where there are no symptoms. (For information on coping with withdrawal, see the section, "How to quit.") Smoking also makes your body get rid of certain drugs faster than usual. When you quit smoking, it changes the way your body handles some medicines. Ask your doctor if any medicines you take regularly need to be checked or changed after you quit. Tagged: addiction health smoking quit-smoking stop-smoking

Tags: smoking, quit-smoking, stop-smoking, health, addiction

Much Information from http://www.cancer.org

Amazing tech and social buzz in less time, 7 slick tricks

 Amazing tech and social buzz in less time, 7 slick tricks

What can I say, the new tech geek by nature is a technology junkie. I want more web more social sharing more information faster broader updates and all that with a bowl O’ grits. The problem is how do you get your technology fix fast enough to satisfy but solid enough to actually view it. How in the world can you use dozens of social and web news sites microblog and still get anything done? How do you digg up and stumble thru hundreds if not thousands of pages a day. Music streaming video life streams and grid casting can really slow your systems let alone absorb way to much life.
Recently a SEM Friend brought me ‘out of the closet’ no not the rainbow one, the social web O holic closet. During a search engine marketing optimization research investigation, leaked to me, it became apparent I am a bit of a super internet social site share junky. To top that all off we found out I outpaced not only the worlds top A listers but the internet marketers, social promoters, search engine marketers and seo’s when it came to being on internet based social sharing and communications sites.
OK I admit it, I am a total web O holic. Also since this is a long post here is a short version of the list:

  • Pidgin Open source IM and email client using very low resources

  • Mahalo Combination wiki search and social site with useful tools

  • HelloTxt Multiple microblog and social update service with stats

  • Diigo not just another bookmaking site with great integration

  • Digsby The slickest social instant messenger and email client yet.

Amazingly enough as it sounds, I do have not computer time, and still keep up a pace even the professionals in each respective field cant match across the board. There are two main factors and for most of us they really make all the difference.
You probably just like me have no constant overseer of how we are online, not saying when or what overall we do, just how. Most of the people who are professionals in marketing SEM SEO recruiting or training all have an issue we wont. Everyone is staring at them so they have to think about every sill thing they link blog or even in the social micro blogging sphere who and what they reply to. That sucks and is no fun but gives your average human an edge in a really odd way, your freedom of form means you can share what you want when you want how you want and it does not really make a difference to your life or income.
The second is the options, I try almost every new site any interesting new software gadget or app. I run what works and dump what sucks or slows me down. This might sound odd but if your part of a bigger company or have everything you do looked at, what you use is often as important as who you talk to. Telling the boss or client this new thingy you installed broke something can suck.
Some really popular sites and software are a pain in the butt and you can use something much better to do it much faster. Just to help you out and show you the difference I will even give you a short list ;)
SocialAddict many folks have under rated this great adobe air app not only does it interface with 11 websites social networks microblogs aggregators and status update service but it use low ram. You can run it all out and still not slow down your other system software. That makes the time you invest in the web more efficient and effective.
Pidgin again an under rated software, pidgin is an open source instant messenger client and handles some social site with great email updates. While it does not have microblogs or face book wired in it does not each much ram either. The combination of pidgin and the aforementioned Social Addict will work on almost any system together at the same time easy.
Digsby not so badly spoken of is the rockin out the box newcomer Digsby. Digsby lock up twitter myspace facebook instant messaging email and a bit more. If you have the resources Digsby is the bomb, but it does all by itself eat as much ram in one bits as the two prior softs and apps together.
Hellotxt back to the underdogs here I think but Hellotxt.com rocks for the normal folks. When you don’t need to hit a handful of blogs and just want to update the web with what up share something good show a picture or video with friends. Hello text is the spot to get it done. You can shout to all you microblogs and main communication type site like facebook or myspace all in one shot. They even have video pic friend and link stats so you can see what liked by your friends.
Diigo not just another bookmarking site … really. While digg worried about fairness and del.icio.us was getting some new style, diigo made more options and better technology. Diigo will let you bookmark to other sites interface with your blog and share socially with friends. Did I mention the tech, you get notes bookmarks collaboration and a photo mash screen view slideshow maker to knock any nerds socks off.
Mahalo no its not stumbleupon its Mahalo and its cool. Mahalo is another newer social site that helps you share to more than one place. Mahalo is also a great social search engine and wiki site. You can browse and even use other social profiles and site right in you homepage its pretty sweet.
Scour search not the most popular search engine but an awesome way to get the mixed results from google msn and yahoo all at once. the extra kicker is a cool point system and social rating with comments. Its great fun to do thumbs and notes on search results don’t you think.
Now to cut this long post short. I hope this helps some others out a bit, I know it smooth’s my days and night online. If you know anything good and new feel free to share it I am sure I’ll check it out to.

Originalliy ‘New Tech Geek’ Tags: apps, help, social, tools, social apps

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